September 2018 - Hot Diggity! Pet Sitting

Diabetes is one of the commonly known medical conditions that can affect humans and animals like cats, pigs, dogs, and horses. Just like humans, a big part of caring for a diabetic cat is at-home care and pet owners need to know as much about their pet’s condition as possible – from symptoms through the diagnosis process and treatment options. While there is no permanent cure for diabetes, it can be regulated and managed so your cat can continue live a quality life.  

Usually, diabetes is more common for older pets, but it can present in younger and pregnant pets as well. Obesity and a high carbohydrate diet are two of the most commonly known triggers that may lead to diabetes in cats, while for dogs genetics play a more dominating role.

Like humans, cats develop diabetes when the pancreas doesn’t produce an adequate amount of insulin or the production is inefficient, leading to unstable blood sugar level or diabetes in the cat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose or sugar in the body travel to cells where it gets turned into energy.

Symptoms

Just like most other medical issues, the earlier you diagnose your cat’s condition, the easier it is for you to stabilize his or her sugar level.

Increased appetite is one of the most common signs of diabetes, especially if your cat is losing weight even when eating more, or while her diet remains the same as before. Excessive thirst is another symptom and this, naturally, leads to more frequent urination. With diabetic cats, dehydration is a real potential, even though they’re consuming more water than usual.  

Diagnosis

If you notice these symptoms, make an appointment with your vet right away for a physical exam and blood and urine tests to positively diagnose diabetes. Head’s up – before testing can be done, your vet may ask you to not feed anything for at least 12 hours before your appointment.  

Treatment

Cats need insulin to properly utilize glucose and metabolize protein and fats to produce energy for the body. With problems in the production of the insulin hormone, sugar or glucose may accumulate inside the blood vessels. This excess glucose can go to waste through the urine, which may starve the body for energy. One of the most commonly prescribed treatment options for diabetes is insulin therapy, which involves giving an insulin injection to meet the deficiency. (Hot Diggity! pet sitters can administer insulin shots while you’re at work or out of town – just let us know this is part of your pet care needs.)

Cats may need some medications along with the insulin injections and working with your vet on a treatment program is key. Besides the medical care, treatment often involves proper home care from healthy meal planning to getting some exercise on regular basis.

If you have more questions about your cat’s diabetes, make sure to consult your veterinarian for help and to provide the best care for your pet.


This guest post is from Mike Hutson, a blogger who believes you can tell a lot about a person by how they treat their pet. Being an animal lover and a pet owner himself, Mike uses his blog to create more awareness for how one can take better care of their pets, by talking about diabetic cat treatment options and other general precautions. You can follow him on Twitter here.