Vancouver Archives - Hot Diggity! Dog Walking + Pet Sitting

We can hardly believe Hot Diggity! started in Portland 18 years ago to fill the gaps for pet owners who wanted walkers more reliable than the kid next door, and sitters that could offer in-home care for sensitive pets. Professional “best friends” were in demand and life-long Portlander Hunter Sunrise saw an opportunity to serve his hometown.

We’ ve grown over the next 18 years to our current count of 130 go-to pet care providers, covering Portland, Vancouver and Seattle. All are experienced animal lovers first and foremost, fully vetted by are awesome administrative team, and active community members outside of work.

“We’ve been around the block a few times in the last two decades and there’s nothing your pet can throw at us (figuratively or literally) that we haven’t handled before.” – Hunter Sunrise, Founder and Owner

Still active in the day to day run of show, Hunter makes sure the business stays true to its core values of kindness, dependability, honesty, love and care for your furry friends.

Reach out today if you’re interested in dog walks, in-home pet sitting, group or solo hikes and more! 

Dental health is important for animals just like it is for people – be sure to get Buster’s teeth looked at regularly and check out the American Veterinary Medical Association’s website for important tips and a quiz to test how much you know about pet dental health!

Pet Life Hack:

You can also make your own toothpaste with this simple recipe!

2 tablespoons of baking soda (gets rid of plaque)

2 tablespoons of cinnamon (makes your pup’s breath smell nice)

1/3 cup of coconut oil (holds the ingredients together)

1 beef bouillon cube (makes the toothpaste yummy!)

 

Combine 2 tablespoons of cinnamon and 2 tablespoons of baking soda into a bowl and mix. Add ⅓ cup coconut oil and stir again. Put the beef bouillon cube into a separate bowl and use the back of a spoon to chop the cube up. Add the chopped cube to the rest of the mixture and blend until everything is one uniform color. (Yes, it will look like refried beans…or poo…but it will be a tasty treat for Buster!)

Use a regular toothbrush or wrap your pointer finger in gauze and brush your dog’s teeth in a circular motion, aiming at the areas with the most plaque, and calmly talking them through the process. Rinse off any excess toothpaste in their water dish and enjoy that healthy pearly white smile!

Pets add so much joy to our lives and we want to reciprocate this unconditional love, however, daily responsibilities like work and school often mean that we can’t spend as much time with Buster as we’d like.

It’s hard to come home tired after a long day and work up the energy to take your energetic pup out for the exercise they need. Don’t sweat it – we’re here to support pet lovers so no one needs to forego pet parenthood because of work, family, travel or educational pursuits.

One of the most important ways we support pet lovers is with daily dog walks, which help reduce stress for both you and your pup; you don’t worry when you’re home late and Buster doesn’t become anxious, depressed, or unhealthy.

Healthy

With diabetes and obesity becoming increasingly common among dogs, daily exercise is a great preventative approach to keeping Buster healthy, happy, and agile for years to come. The amount of exercise needed varies by breed between 30 minutes to two hours per day and vets agree that regular walks promote digestive health, keep aging dogs limber, relieve joint pain, maintain a healthy weight and reduce the risk of heart disease, high-blood pressure and diabetes.

Happy

Walks also support emotional well-being, maintain routine and reduce stress, anxiety, depression, and other emotional and behavioral issues by allowing your pet to get exercise, explore, and enjoy company and love during the day. Dogs build up a lot of restless energy during the day and often have a hard time finding productive, nondestructive ways to keep themselves entertained. Release that energy in a healthy way by going on a midday walk instead of turning to shoes or couch cushions for entertainment.

Social

In addition to being a great form of exercise, walking can be an exciting part of your dog’s day. Daily walks help with socialization, allowing pups to explore new scents and sights in addition to meeting other dogs and humans. Walks are also a great way to practice walking on a leash and reinforcing training, reducing aggression and anxiety in the future.

Whether your 15-year old bulldog wants a slow 30-minute saunter around the neighborhood or your Shepherd puppy needs a two-hour forest pack hike to be worn out, our award-winning team is here to help you create the perfect walking experience for your family.

Get in touch to schedule weekly walks or talk to our admin team about your favorite four-legged walker or hiker.

Just the word “Christmas” evokes images of snow-covered grounds, an evergreen wreath on the front door, a crackling fireplace with a tree covered in twinkling lights, and a cozy couch where you are snuggled up along with your pooch (or person), sipping on a hot beverage…and watching that classic movie that puts you in the holiday spirit!

In many houses watching Christmas movies is a tradition that has been around for several generations. It is also a great way to unwind after a hectic day and remember this is a time of year for family in all of its definitions, child-like joy and yearly reflection. If you need some inspiration for tonight’s Netflix search, the folks at Top Dog Tips compiled this list of 82 heart-warming Christmas movies that feature some of our favorite four-legged companions!

There are some classics and others that were new to us. Whether you’re snuggling in for the weekend or looking for a last-minute gift for the dog-loving coworker you picked for Secret Santa this year, there’s something here for everyone. Wishing you and your family the happiest of holidays!

We are so lucky that we get to live in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest and enjoy outdoor time with pups all over the city – every day! All of us at Hot Diggity! love exploring the natural beauty around us, whether that’s on a forest pack hike or an overnight getaway with our own fur babies. Last week we shared some of our favorite spots on the Oregon Coast and Bend/Sisters area. This week, we’re looking east to the Gorge-ous Columbia River and Hood River for hikes and local brews!

Hood River

Sometimes you just need room to run. Pups and humans picked up the pace with the Columbia Gorge Half Marathon’s Dog Leg on October 21st! We’re going to start training for next year…as soon as we finish the rest of this Halloween candy…

Just about an hour outside of Portland, the small town of Hood River is packed full of dog-friendly restaurants, places to stay, and of course hiking trails—like the 2.8-mile Hood River Waterfront Trail and The Spit, a 40-acre sandbar flanked by the Hood and Columbia rivers.

Westcliff Lodge allows pets in their beautiful Riverview Rooms and Cottage Suites, and many local hotels are happy to provide a comfy rest after you’ve lived out your gold medal dreams!

Celebrate with a local rosé at the Naked Winery where Buster is welcome in the tasting room with you—and even encouraged to take a selfie in a red feather boa. For homemade (dog) biscuits under the ever-watchful statue of Lucky, check out the locally owned Pine Street Bakery & Pine Street Kitchen.

Grab your morning cup of energy at 10 Speed Coffee Company and check out some of the beautiful waterfalls that line the Gorge as you meander your way back to the city.**

Columbia Gorge Waterfalls

Punchbowl Falls, south of Hood River on Hwy 35 occurs at the confluence of the East Fork and West Fork of the Hood River. The quarter-mile trail follows a basalt cliff and leads to a beach right above the falls, where you and your pup can see all the way to Mt. Hood on a clear day. The nearby Dead Point Creek Falls is just above Punchbowl Falls where the Hood enters an impressive canyon with columnar basalt formations before plunging 75 feet in a two-tiered display.

Back on the I-84 side of things, keep an eye out for two of our favorite Columbia Gorge hikes, re-opening soon!

Wahclella Falls, is a 1.8-mile hike along Tanner Creek that takes you through the verdant green that makes Oregon forests so iconic and ends with a gorgeous two-tiered waterfall. This trail can serve as a nice warm-up for Angel’s Rest, or if you’re not up for a strenuous hike, pair Wahclella Falls with the famed Multnomah Falls, which is also dog-friendly. Both falls are on-leash.

Angel’s Rest is a 9.4-mile loop just outside of Corbett, OR. This longer hike takes you past Coopey Falls before reaching 1.6 miles of switchbacks that reward you with a 270-degree view of the Columbia River Gorge and Beacon Rock in Washington. Dogs are welcome on-leash.

Thirsty yet? The patio at Thunder Island Brewing in Cascade Locks offers a beautiful view of the Columbia River and Bridge of the Gods, and welcomes Buster who will most likely just want to snooze at your side after all that hiking. Enjoy the local craft beer, salads, and sandwiches before finishing your journey home.

** Traveler Alert: This area was impacted by the recent Eagle Creek Fire. Before you head out, please check with USFS for the most up-to-date information on closures.

Are you ready to go? Sharing all of these awesome adventures has us ready to stand up from the computer and get outside. At Hot Diggity!, a dog-sitting and dog-walking service in Portland, they love taking pups out on the trails and Forest Pack Hikes around the Portland area. If you’re too busy to take your pups on the trails just now, feel free to call them up about getting your dogs into Pack Club today!

One of the great benefits of living in the Pacific Northwest is the incredible natural beauty available to us. You don’t need to journey far to find fantastic dog-friendly hiking areas with everything from mountain views to waterfalls. Fall leaves and a break from our hotter-than-average summer mean it’s the perfect time to escape the city for a day trip or a weekend getaway.

Oregon Coast

We Portlanders often forget how easy it is to drive to Lincoln City, Cannon Beach, or Astoria for a day of adventures. With 363 miles of public coastline, Oregon’s beaches are perfect for running through the waves, chasing seagulls, and chilling on the sand. Most beaches allow dogs on-leash or off-leash with direct voice control (with some exceptions during the snowy plover nesting season March 15 to September 15).

Ecola State Park is just a mile north of downtown Cannon Beach and offers cliffs, beaches, an abandoned lighthouse, and a network of trails that includes an 8-mile segment of the Oregon Coast Trail, and the 2 1/2 mile Clatsop Loop Trail. It’s also a prime spot for viewing migrating gray whale, Roosevelt elk, and bald eagles.

Once everyone is thoroughly windblown and sand-covered, head to one of the many dog-friendly restaurants and breweries where you can refresh and relax while Buster can be social with other canine passersby.

Don’t want to head home just yet? The Cannery Pier Hotel in Astoria offers pet-friendly rooms with fireplaces and balconies that look out onto the river. More adventurous? Head south to Tillamook where Cape Lookout State Park offers full-hookup sites, tent sites, six pet-friendly yurts, and three pet-friendly cabins and hiking trails nestled among old growth forests. The nature trail uses numbered markers keyed to a trail guide if you want to learn about native trees and other plants.

Bend

Heading east instead of west, Bend is almost as dog-friendly as Portland itself and the landscape offers high desert majesty all year long. After 3+ hours in the car, the beautiful hikes near the town are a welcome way to stretch your legs—and for Buster to explore the local smells and sounds. The Metolius River Trail is a 12-mile relatively flat stretch through the Deschutes National Forest at the base of Black Butte. The trail can be broken up into smaller pieces with the West Metolius River Trail stretch offering a waterfall and a number of activity options for you and your pup. Todd Lake Trail is an on-leash loop near Sunriver that features a lake for cooling off. Good Dog Trail (or Rimrock Trail) is a local favorite enroute to Mt. Bachelor. Upper Deschutes River Trail and Green Lakes Trail both allow dogs to be off-leash starting on September 15th.

Once you’ve worked out an appetite, check out some of the many options in the Old Mill District. Downtown you’ll find both all sorts of shops and restaurants including J-Dub—Buster will flip for the Pup Menu featuring Pooch Hooch, the house-made dog “beer” (non-carbonated and non-alchoholic) made with beef, malt, and glucosamine to keep your pup’s joints happy after all the outdoor adventures.

It’s hard to say whether Bend has more hiking trails or restaurants, so stay overnight at pet-friendly Townplace Suites by Marriott (look for the “Fluffy Friends Stay Free” package) or MyPlace Extended Stay Hotel (80 pound limit and up to two pets per room) so you have extra days to relax and enjoy spots like the McKay Cottage Restaurant, 10 Barrel Brewing, and Cascade Lakes Brewing… though almost any patio you find will welcome a four-legged diner.

Next week we’re traveling to Hood River and the Gorge and sharing some of our favorite hikes! Stay tuned…

So, your beloved Buster has taken over your couch and chances are, they make you feel guilty by staring at you with their huge puppy-dog eyes each time you tell them to come down. If this keeps up, you won’t be able to enjoy watching your favorite TV show without smelling musty or getting pet hair all over your jeans. (Although pet hair is an emblem of love for many fur-parents, your guests might think otherwise.) And now that autumn is bringing back Portland’s signature rain (and mud), you really don’t want your outdoorsy dog tracking dirt onto your furniture. So, what now?

1. Break the Habit and Stick to the New Rule

Breaking the habit is going to be a challenge if you and your dog are used to snuggling on the couch or watch TV together; however, you need to be consistent to be successful. A dog can be clingy and just like a human child, thinks they own everything you do. Whether you have changed your mind about pet-friendly furniture because your dog is shedding heavily or incessantly chewing the couch or pillows, once you make a rule, it’s up to you to stick to it. Make sure every family member (mom, dad, sister, brother, even cat if you can) sticks to the rule; otherwise, it can confuse your furry family member.

2. Training and Treats Go a Long Way

Say “get off,” “down,” or a similar command each time you catch them lying on the couch or as soon as you see them putting their paws up on the furniture. They will act stubbornly at first but be persistent. Bite-sized goodies tossed on the floor can be a good way to entice all four paws onto the ground. When Buster gets it right, make a fuss and reward them with more treats.

3. Make Sure Your Dog Loves Their Bed

The reason dogs prefer lounging on your couch instead of their own bed might be that they find the comfy couch a lot nicer than the bed you bought at a bargain sale. Try making the couch less appealing by providing a cozier and a more enticing bed with pillows and some toys that your dog will surely love. You may also plug in a DAP diffuser near their bed for the first few weeks to create a welcoming atmosphere as they breathe in soothing pheromones.

4. Provide Their Own Sofa

Whether Buster loves fetch, tug-of-war, running, or digging, nothing beats spending time with their owner even if it means binge-watching the newest Shonda Rhimes series all day. Keeping you company is a way of showing how much they love you, and we all love that feeling. Instead of telling Buster to go away, provide a comfy alternative to your sofa – and if a regular dog bed isn’t cutting it, you may want to try creating their own sofa or chair. You can place it right beside your couch so you can both be comfortable while the two of you spend quality time together.

5. Don’t Punish the Pooch

We hope this goes without saying: never punish your pet by hitting or spanking. Not only is negative punishment harsh and cruel, but it is also ineffective and will only result in more behavioral issues. Scold them, tell them “off” or another word you decide to use when they try to push the boundaries and use positive reinforcement to reward good behavior instead of punishing naughtiness. If Buster growls at you or challenges you when you enforce boundaries, you may want to think about taking some training classes together to reinforce your authority and strengthen your bond.

You and Buster love each other and with a few simple (and consistent) changes, you can enjoy your quality time together in a way that keeps everyone happy.

 

This guest post is from Brian Morgan, an editor at DogBedZone.com where he writes about picking the best dog bed for your pup. The site also features tips, guides, and resources for dog owners.

Diabetes is one of the commonly known medical conditions that can affect humans and animals like cats, pigs, dogs, and horses. Just like humans, a big part of caring for a diabetic cat is at-home care and pet owners need to know as much about their pet’s condition as possible – from symptoms through the diagnosis process and treatment options. While there is no permanent cure for diabetes, it can be regulated and managed so your cat can continue live a quality life.  

Usually, diabetes is more common for older pets, but it can present in younger and pregnant pets as well. Obesity and a high carbohydrate diet are two of the most commonly known triggers that may lead to diabetes in cats, while for dogs genetics play a more dominating role.

Like humans, cats develop diabetes when the pancreas doesn’t produce an adequate amount of insulin or the production is inefficient, leading to unstable blood sugar level or diabetes in the cat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose or sugar in the body travel to cells where it gets turned into energy.

Symptoms

Just like most other medical issues, the earlier you diagnose your cat’s condition, the easier it is for you to stabilize his or her sugar level.

Increased appetite is one of the most common signs of diabetes, especially if your cat is losing weight even when eating more, or while her diet remains the same as before. Excessive thirst is another symptom and this, naturally, leads to more frequent urination. With diabetic cats, dehydration is a real potential, even though they’re consuming more water than usual.  

Diagnosis

If you notice these symptoms, make an appointment with your vet right away for a physical exam and blood and urine tests to positively diagnose diabetes. Head’s up – before testing can be done, your vet may ask you to not feed anything for at least 12 hours before your appointment.  

Treatment

Cats need insulin to properly utilize glucose and metabolize protein and fats to produce energy for the body. With problems in the production of the insulin hormone, sugar or glucose may accumulate inside the blood vessels. This excess glucose can go to waste through the urine, which may starve the body for energy. One of the most commonly prescribed treatment options for diabetes is insulin therapy, which involves giving an insulin injection to meet the deficiency. (Hot Diggity! pet sitters can administer insulin shots while you’re at work or out of town – just let us know this is part of your pet care needs.)

Cats may need some medications along with the insulin injections and working with your vet on a treatment program is key. Besides the medical care, treatment often involves proper home care from healthy meal planning to getting some exercise on regular basis.

If you have more questions about your cat’s diabetes, make sure to consult your veterinarian for help and to provide the best care for your pet.


This guest post is from Mike Hutson, a blogger who believes you can tell a lot about a person by how they treat their pet. Being an animal lover and a pet owner himself, Mike uses his blog to create more awareness for how one can take better care of their pets, by talking about diabetic cat treatment options and other general precautions. You can follow him on Twitter here.

Summer is officially here and plants are on our minds!

Thanks to the miracle of chlorophyll, even during winter plants are fantastic at keeping our indoor air clean and fresh. They’re also great for supporting our mental health by reducing our stress levels. Unfortunately, many indoor horticulturists’ favorite plants are dangerous to the health of our four-legged family members.

Lilies, asparagus ferns, and even aloe vera can be dangerous for curious pets and cause discomfort, illness, or even endanger their lives. Unless you keep your plants high out of reach and are careful about picking up any fallen leaves, it’s best to proactively protect your family by making sure the plants you do bring home won’t pose any risk.

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of 6 beautiful and commonly available plants that are perfect for improving your home while keeping your pets safe.

Pink Jasmine (Jasminum polyanthum): This beautiful plant (pictured above) will bloom nearly all year long starting in February, filling your home with it’s wonderful scent and providing you with beautiful star-shaped white and pink blossoms. In the summer months it loves lots of indirect sunlight, and during the winter it doesn’t need as much, making it perfect for those Pacific Northwest grey days. During the summer the soil should be moist, though you can let it dry between waterings. Water it less through the fall, and let it be slightly dry in the winter and spring seasons. The blossoms require a humid atmosphere which isn’t too hard to achieve in the Portland area, but if you’re finding it’s dropping it’s blossoms too quickly you can set the pot on top of a pan filled with pebbles and add a small layer of water to the pebbles that will evaporate and add moisture to the air.

Note that not all varieties of Jasmine plants can withstand living indoors. Some can grow up to 15’ tall and while that would definitely provide you with a huge wall of gorgeous flowers, it would probably be a little difficult to care for. Make sure that when purchasing a Jasmine plant you find one that can thrive in the indoors. It will also want to trail, so it’s best to set it up on a high shelf, put it in a hanging basket, or give it some scaffolding to climb.

For more information about growing Pink Jasmine indoors, check out this blog post from Dave’s Garden.

 

Madagascar Jasmine (Stephanotis floribunda): Despite being called “Madagascar Jasmine” this plant is not part of the Jasmine family. Unlike Jasmine which is native to China, Stephanotis floribunda is native to Madagascar. It too has beautiful star-shaped white flowers and smells wonderful, but you’ll find it’s leaves are larger and darker than that of Pink Jasmine. Madagascar Jasmine is a bit more sensitive than Pink Jasmine, but you’ll never have to worry about them when you leave for vacations (maybe to Madagascar!) because here at Hot Diggity! we’re always careful to follow all your household care notes.

Madagascar Jasmine requires strong, but indirect sunlight. They need loamy soil that drains well but maintains moisture. Don’t worry about creating your own mix, just be sure to buy high quality potting soil when going plant shopping. They too need to have humid air, so also consider putting their pot on top of a rock plate with a small layer of water that can evaporate over the day for them. Misting with a spray bottle can also be effective.

 

Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum)

Spider plants are classic, easy to care for, and they sprout lots of new shoots so it’s easy to share them with your pet (or plant) loving friends! They grow well in low-light conditions so they can bring some color to our grey winter days without the need for a grow light. They need a fair amount of water and like to dry out between watering. They’re hearty so even if you’re notoriously bad at keeping houseplants alive (we get it) this is a great starter option!

Spider plants can be grown in pots or hanging baskets, so keep in mind that their stems and grass-like leaves have a tendency to dangle. It might be a good idea to place them high up to avoid any cat-induced accidents – those little tufts can look a lot like feather toys to some – though this is more for the plant’s sake since they’re safe for any curious cat or dog.

 

African Violets (Saintpaulia)

African violets can bring a beautiful pop of purple, pink, blue, or white to your home (depending on the variety). This generally low-maintenance plant can thrive without bright light and bloom throughout the year, though just like many cats we know, they do enjoy warmth and a sunny spot as much as possible.

Added bonus – they also bring air purifying goodness to your indoor spaces!

 

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata bostoniensis)

Thanks to Garfield, we know that ferns are not harmful to cats (and the ASPCA confirms that Boston ferns are safe for both cats and dogs). It’s like bringing a little bit of the beautiful Pacific Northwest forest indoors, and just like in their forest homes, they do well with high humidity and indirect light.

If you need to have the fern in a dryer environment (like when we’re all blasting the heat mid-January) you may want to mist it once or twice a week or set it in a tray of pebbles and water. Placing your fern in the bathroom where it naturally gets a steam bath is a great hands-off option!

The Boston fern is one of the easiest to care for, but all true ferns such as the maidenhair are great for pet-friendly households. However, beware some so-called “ferns” such as the asparagus fern, which is in fact part of the lily family.

 

Palms (Chamaedora)

There are many types of palms that are safe for the furry members of the household, including areca, bamboo, parlor, and ponytail palms, and they’re all relatively easy to care for as well! Despite the sunny beach association the name inspires, palms don’t need a lot of light and do well in just about any room in the house.

The parlor palm (pictured) is a charming houseplant grows in clusters. The areca is a more quintessential tree-like version that can grow to seven feet, while the ponytail palm grows to around three feet, and the bamboo palm really makes a statement at up to 12 feet tall and five feet wide. Keep the size in mind when selecting the location and the pot!

Palms like their soil to dry out between waterings, so you will only need to water once a week (or less). Test the soil before you water and make sure they’re draining well and not sitting in water. Ponytail palms are in fact succulents so their trunks store water and only require minimal watering in the winter. The ponytail palm likes bright light, so in Oregon it could do well being outdoors in the summer and indoors in the colder months.  

Keep in mind that (like the “fern”) seeing “palm” in a plant’s common name isn’t a guarantee that it’s safe for pets. The sago palm, for example, is not true palm but rather a cycad and is toxic to pets.

There are many options for pet-friendly indoor plants depending on your style and space and all of these listed are relatively easy to find at the local garden center or nursery. They range in size, color, and shape, and are fairly easy to care for in an indoor setting in the greater Pacific Northwest region so feel free to bring that green indoors!

July 4th usually means lots of fireworks, and lots of fireworks can cause some serious anxiety for your pets. Here are a few friendly ways to help keep your pets calm when the show begins:

  1. Keep your pets indoors before the fireworks are set to begin. If they need to go outside, be sure to keep them on a leash.
  2. If possible, keep your pets with you. They will feel the most at ease in your presence.
  3. If you plan on being away from home, avoid leaving your pet alone. Having someone around with whom your pets are familiar with is a great alternative. (We’ll be there with extra snuggles if you need us!) If you plan on taking pets to a boarding facility, take them for a visit beforehand or use a place they are already familiar with. A new experience combined with the loud noises can cause extra stress.
  4. If there are lots of fireworks in your neighborhood, it’s not a bad idea to start preparing your pet by acclimating them to the sound of fireworks. Playing recordings or videos will help prep your pets so they’re not completely caught off guard the night of the celebrations.
  5. Drown out the loud booms by playing music or having the TV on at a decently loud volume.
  6. Make sure the blinds and curtains are closed.
  7. Keep in mind that many pets love to crawl into confined spaces when they are scared. Dogs, in particular, may want to be in their kennel or hide under the bed. Allow them access to these spaces to seek out extra comfort.
  8. For pets who already have major anxiety, you may want to ask your vet about a mild sedative or look into purchasing a ThunderShirt.
  9. Provide your pets with lots of extra exercise that day to help wear them out.
  10. Give your pets something fun to play and occupy their attention such as a Kong toy filled with treats or xylitol-free dog-safe peanut butter or new catnip toys for your cats.
  11. Make sure all garbage cans and bags are well sealed so a curious or anxious dog doesn’t decide to go after the leftovers from your BBQ or picnic or munch on shiny fireworks remnants looking for food.

And remember, all pets should have their collar on with identification tags in case you get separated. If they’re microchipped, make sure the information is up to date. New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July are the two biggest days of the year for pets on the loose.

By taking some precautions to comfort them we can help keep our furry friends safe and calm so we can all enjoy celebrating!

Sources: dovelewis.org, positively.com, cesarsway.com