Fun Archives - Hot Diggity! Pet Sitting

We are so lucky that we get to live in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest and enjoy outdoor time with pups all over the city – every day! All of us at Hot Diggity! love exploring the natural beauty around us, whether that’s on a forest pack hike or an overnight getaway with our own fur babies. Last week we shared some of our favorite spots on the Oregon Coast and Bend/Sisters area. This week, we’re looking east to the Gorge-ous Columbia River and Hood River for hikes and local brews!

Hood River

Sometimes you just need room to run. Pups and humans picked up the pace with the Columbia Gorge Half Marathon’s Dog Leg on October 21st! We’re going to start training for next year…as soon as we finish the rest of this Halloween candy…

Just about an hour outside of Portland, the small town of Hood River is packed full of dog-friendly restaurants, places to stay, and of course hiking trails—like the 2.8-mile Hood River Waterfront Trail and The Spit, a 40-acre sandbar flanked by the Hood and Columbia rivers.

Westcliff Lodge allows pets in their beautiful Riverview Rooms and Cottage Suites, and many local hotels are happy to provide a comfy rest after you’ve lived out your gold medal dreams!

Celebrate with a local rosé at the Naked Winery where Buster is welcome in the tasting room with you—and even encouraged to take a selfie in a red feather boa. For homemade (dog) biscuits under the ever-watchful statue of Lucky, check out the locally owned Pine Street Bakery & Pine Street Kitchen.

Grab your morning cup of energy at 10 Speed Coffee Company and check out some of the beautiful waterfalls that line the Gorge as you meander your way back to the city.**

Columbia Gorge Waterfalls

Punchbowl Falls, south of Hood River on Hwy 35 occurs at the confluence of the East Fork and West Fork of the Hood River. The quarter-mile trail follows a basalt cliff and leads to a beach right above the falls, where you and your pup can see all the way to Mt. Hood on a clear day. The nearby Dead Point Creek Falls is just above Punchbowl Falls where the Hood enters an impressive canyon with columnar basalt formations before plunging 75 feet in a two-tiered display.

Back on the I-84 side of things, keep an eye out for two of our favorite Columbia Gorge hikes, re-opening soon!

Wahclella Falls, is a 1.8-mile hike along Tanner Creek that takes you through the verdant green that makes Oregon forests so iconic and ends with a gorgeous two-tiered waterfall. This trail can serve as a nice warm-up for Angel’s Rest, or if you’re not up for a strenuous hike, pair Wahclella Falls with the famed Multnomah Falls, which is also dog-friendly. Both falls are on-leash.

Angel’s Rest is a 9.4-mile loop just outside of Corbett, OR. This longer hike takes you past Coopey Falls before reaching 1.6 miles of switchbacks that reward you with a 270-degree view of the Columbia River Gorge and Beacon Rock in Washington. Dogs are welcome on-leash.

Thirsty yet? The patio at Thunder Island Brewing in Cascade Locks offers a beautiful view of the Columbia River and Bridge of the Gods, and welcomes Buster who will most likely just want to snooze at your side after all that hiking. Enjoy the local craft beer, salads, and sandwiches before finishing your journey home.

** Traveler Alert: This area was impacted by the recent Eagle Creek Fire. Before you head out, please check with USFS for the most up-to-date information on closures.

Are you ready to go? Sharing all of these awesome adventures has us ready to stand up from the computer and get outside. At Hot Diggity!, a dog-sitting and dog-walking service in Portland, they love taking pups out on the trails and Forest Pack Hikes around the Portland area. If you’re too busy to take your pups on the trails just now, feel free to call them up about getting your dogs into Pack Club today!

One of the great benefits of living in the Pacific Northwest is the incredible natural beauty available to us. You don’t need to journey far to find fantastic dog-friendly hiking areas with everything from mountain views to waterfalls. Fall leaves and a break from our hotter-than-average summer mean it’s the perfect time to escape the city for a day trip or a weekend getaway.

Oregon Coast

We Portlanders often forget how easy it is to drive to Lincoln City, Cannon Beach, or Astoria for a day of adventures. With 363 miles of public coastline, Oregon’s beaches are perfect for running through the waves, chasing seagulls, and chilling on the sand. Most beaches allow dogs on-leash or off-leash with direct voice control (with some exceptions during the snowy plover nesting season March 15 to September 15).

Ecola State Park is just a mile north of downtown Cannon Beach and offers cliffs, beaches, an abandoned lighthouse, and a network of trails that includes an 8-mile segment of the Oregon Coast Trail, and the 2 1/2 mile Clatsop Loop Trail. It’s also a prime spot for viewing migrating gray whale, Roosevelt elk, and bald eagles.

Once everyone is thoroughly windblown and sand-covered, head to one of the many dog-friendly restaurants and breweries where you can refresh and relax while Buster can be social with other canine passersby.

Don’t want to head home just yet? The Cannery Pier Hotel in Astoria offers pet-friendly rooms with fireplaces and balconies that look out onto the river. More adventurous? Head south to Tillamook where Cape Lookout State Park offers full-hookup sites, tent sites, six pet-friendly yurts, and three pet-friendly cabins and hiking trails nestled among old growth forests. The nature trail uses numbered markers keyed to a trail guide if you want to learn about native trees and other plants.

Bend

Heading east instead of west, Bend is almost as dog-friendly as Portland itself and the landscape offers high desert majesty all year long. After 3+ hours in the car, the beautiful hikes near the town are a welcome way to stretch your legs—and for Buster to explore the local smells and sounds. The Metolius River Trail is a 12-mile relatively flat stretch through the Deschutes National Forest at the base of Black Butte. The trail can be broken up into smaller pieces with the West Metolius River Trail stretch offering a waterfall and a number of activity options for you and your pup. Todd Lake Trail is an on-leash loop near Sunriver that features a lake for cooling off. Good Dog Trail (or Rimrock Trail) is a local favorite enroute to Mt. Bachelor. Upper Deschutes River Trail and Green Lakes Trail both allow dogs to be off-leash starting on September 15th.

Once you’ve worked out an appetite, check out some of the many options in the Old Mill District. Downtown you’ll find both all sorts of shops and restaurants including J-Dub—Buster will flip for the Pup Menu featuring Pooch Hooch, the house-made dog “beer” (non-carbonated and non-alchoholic) made with beef, malt, and glucosamine to keep your pup’s joints happy after all the outdoor adventures.

It’s hard to say whether Bend has more hiking trails or restaurants, so stay overnight at pet-friendly Townplace Suites by Marriott (look for the “Fluffy Friends Stay Free” package) or MyPlace Extended Stay Hotel (80 pound limit and up to two pets per room) so you have extra days to relax and enjoy spots like the McKay Cottage Restaurant, 10 Barrel Brewing, and Cascade Lakes Brewing… though almost any patio you find will welcome a four-legged diner.

Next week we’re traveling to Hood River and the Gorge and sharing some of our favorite hikes! Stay tuned…

July 4th usually means lots of fireworks, and lots of fireworks can cause some serious anxiety for your pets. Here are a few friendly ways to help keep your pets calm when the show begins:

  1. Keep your pets indoors before the fireworks are set to begin. If they need to go outside, be sure to keep them on a leash.
  2. If possible, keep your pets with you. They will feel the most at ease in your presence.
  3. If you plan on being away from home, avoid leaving your pet alone. Having someone around with whom your pets are familiar with is a great alternative. (We’ll be there with extra snuggles if you need us!) If you plan on taking pets to a boarding facility, take them for a visit beforehand or use a place they are already familiar with. A new experience combined with the loud noises can cause extra stress.
  4. If there are lots of fireworks in your neighborhood, it’s not a bad idea to start preparing your pet by acclimating them to the sound of fireworks. Playing recordings or videos will help prep your pets so they’re not completely caught off guard the night of the celebrations.
  5. Drown out the loud booms by playing music or having the TV on at a decently loud volume.
  6. Make sure the blinds and curtains are closed.
  7. Keep in mind that many pets love to crawl into confined spaces when they are scared. Dogs, in particular, may want to be in their kennel or hide under the bed. Allow them access to these spaces to seek out extra comfort.
  8. For pets who already have major anxiety, you may want to ask your vet about a mild sedative or look into purchasing a ThunderShirt.
  9. Provide your pets with lots of extra exercise that day to help wear them out.
  10. Give your pets something fun to play and occupy their attention such as a Kong toy filled with treats or xylitol-free dog-safe peanut butter or new catnip toys for your cats.
  11. Make sure all garbage cans and bags are well sealed so a curious or anxious dog doesn’t decide to go after the leftovers from your BBQ or picnic or munch on shiny fireworks remnants looking for food.

And remember, all pets should have their collar on with identification tags in case you get separated. If they’re microchipped, make sure the information is up to date. New Year’s Eve and the 4th of July are the two biggest days of the year for pets on the loose.

By taking some precautions to comfort them we can help keep our furry friends safe and calm so we can all enjoy celebrating!

Sources: dovelewis.org, positively.com, cesarsway.com

 

Last year, Hot Diggity! introduced an exciting new offering to all our clients; Forest Pack Hikes! This isn’t a normal potty break or breath of fresh air, this is a full-on socialization and sensory-rich adventure for your pups. When Pack Club dogs realize that it’s a Hike Day, they get as excited as if they’re going to Doggie Disneyland.

All dogs go through an initial consultation where we determine if they’re ready for Pack Club and if so, which personality pack they fit best. Dogs must go through this approval process to make sure that everyone has a great time on the hike and that the pups who are more interested in the smells at every corner don’t slow down the speedsters who want to crack their previous distance record.

On the hikes with our trained Pack Hike Leaders, the dogs get to explore a variety of trails depending on the day, and always on-leash. Each trail offers its different scents, sounds, and sights. This increased stimulation is beneficial for your dog’s mental and physical well-being. Instead of seeing the same things day after day at the route near your home, dogs on hikes get to explore a treasury of experiences that a forest has to offer. Over here are deer smells! Over there is an owl hooting! There are so many rocks and plants to sniff!

Currently, we have morning (7-noon) and afternoon (12-5) pack hikes three days a week, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. This means that while you’re stuck at the office, your dog is having the time of their life roaming the forest with a pack of friends. You might not be able to enjoy the sunshine and fresh air from your desk, but your dog will be savoring that fresh forest oxygen and can tell you all about it after work.

Bella the labradoodle kisses our award winning Portland pet sitter and pack leader Alex on the face in his car as they're getting ready to drive home after a fun pack hike adventure

This is the only service we offer where we take multiple dogs from different families out at one time (unless you’ve signed up for Buddy Walks with a friend). Each pack has a maximum of six members, but the number will vary between packs and days. Normally we love offering specialized individual attention, but spending time with other canines is beneficial, too. Without regular socialization, dogs can become shy and reactive towards others of their own kind. This behavior often leads to further isolation from other dogs, and further behavioral problems that will then have to be addressed by a professional dog trainer. With Pack Club your dog(s) can enjoy the companionship of other pups well-suited to their personalities. While on their adventure, good behavior is rewarded through positive reinforcement training by our Pack Leaders. 

Some important things to remember before applying for Pack Club:

  • We require that dogs be up to date on their vaccinations and on their flea and tick prevention.
  • They need to have a normal, non-extendable, leash and tags on their collars with accurate information.

Even though our Pack Hike Leaders are extremely responsible and excellent pet caretakers, we just want to be prepared as best as we can and for your dog to be as protected as they can.

When the fun hike is said and done and everyone is all tuckered out from the great exercise and sensory experiences, our Pack Leaders give your dogs a towel wipe-down, check them for any little pesky passengers that may have tried to hitch a ride, make sure everyone is hydrated, and then load the gang up and take everyone home where they’ll probably be sleeping and dreaming of the fun they had on their hike until you come back home from work.

If you want to apply to get your pup accepted into Pack Club, just email us with your interest or give us a call! We still have a few spaces available and would love for your pup to join in on the fun. Three dogs go on a hike out in a field leading to a forest in the distance with their pack leader

Do you love making snacks for other people? What about your pets? Thanks to the internet there are a ton of DIY Dog Treat recipes available. By making the treats yourself you can control the nutritional content and ensure that your dog’s snacks are free of any dietary restrictions they might have. Here are 3 recipes guaranteed to make your dog a happy dog!

Just remember, snacks are no real alternative to their normal healthy diet and should only be provided in moderation in order to ensure that your pups stay healthy and fit.

Leftovers Trail Mix Supreme: Combine any of the following leftovers from your refrigerator to create a flavorful trail mix that you can bring along on a hike with your dog, or to feed your dog as a snack after a trip to the dog park.

Ingredients:

  • Pieces of meat (unseasoned best- or first rinse off any seasoning/flavoring, remember that onions and garlic are harmful to dogs as is too much salt!)
  • Potatoes
  • Vegetables such as carrots or green beans (no onions or garlic!)
  • Fruit such as apples or bananas (no grapes/raisins)

Directions:

  1. Cut ingredients into ½ inch thick pieces and mix together
  2. Lay ingredients on a small baking tray and spray lightly with cooking spray
  3. Place in a food dehydrator or an oven set to 200°F until dried.

Homemade Pumpkin Biscuits: Use cute dog treat shaped cookie cutters to make your own special doggie biscuits at home! Make sure to use only unsalted and xylitol-free peanut butter when making this recipe. Xylitol is poisonous to dogs and too much sodium is bad for their cardiovascular health like it is with humans. Adam’s 100% Natural Creamy and Unsalted Peanut Butter is a great wholesome peanut butter brand that is safe for dogs. You can also substitute cooked sweet potatoes for the pumpkin too if you want!

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup cooked pureed (or canned) pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup creamy peanut butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 1/2 cups ground oat flour

Glaze:

  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup creamy peanut butter

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F degrees.
  2. Combine pumpkin, peanut butter, eggs, and oil in a bowl. Add in some baking soda and oat flour, then stir until a stiff dough forms. Knead dough or mix until flour is incorporated.
  3. Roll out dough with a rolling pin and use a cookie cutter to cut out dog bone shapes, or just bake into whatever shape you like. Bake for 15 minutes.
  4. Heat up the coconut oil and mix with the peanut butter until very smooth. Drizzle over the treats and cool till glaze hardens (it does best in the fridge or freezer).

Doggie Delight Frozen Treats: It might seem like a dream right now coming out of winter, but the hot summer days will be upon us soon and that means you’re going to need creative ways to help your best bud beat the heat! Here’s an easy way to make fun treats that will help keep them cool in the sun. We don’t recommend freezing treats inside Kong or other hollow toys however, the ice can be too strong and suction your dog’s tongue into the toy, causing severe and life-threatening damage if it’s not caught in time. Instead just freeze these treats in ice cube trays or popsicle molds! We promise they’ll be fun enough for your dog as is.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 1 tbs peanut butter (remember, salt and xylitol-free!)
  • 1 tbs unsweetened greek yogurt or unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 tsp flaxseeds (must be stored in fridge in airtight container to avoid spoiling)

Directions:

  1. Mash the banana
  2. Mix with the peanut butter, greek yogurt (or unsweetened applesauce), and flaxseeds
  3. Stuff the mixture into ice cubes or popsicle molds and place into freezer for at least an hour

Have you made any of these for your pups? Did you do anything different? How did they like them? We’re always happy to hear from you!

Is your normal walk or run with Buster just not cutting it? Does the lack of a competitive component to hiking in the woods bore you? Do you and Buster just love to support your favorite organizations while having a fun time? Well we’ve put together a list of 7 Portland Walks and Run events for charity that you can bring Buster to! Due to insurance concerns, not too many runs are open to dogs, but there are still quite a few events still available throughout the year. Here are some charity events held annually around the Portland area that you can bring your dog to:

  1. The Humane Society for SW Washington holds an annual Walk/Run for the Animals usually in May. This is held in Downtown Vancouver and raises funds to support their adoption services. This year the event is May 5th, 2018.
  2. Oregon Humane Society holds an annual Doggie Dash event at the end of May to support finding homes for thousands of homeless pets. This is held in downtown Portland at the Tom McCall Waterfront Park. Doggie Dash will be held on May 12th, 2018.
  3. The Best Friends Society holds an annual Strut Your Mutt event in different cities all around the country including Portland in September. There’s lots of activities to do here even after you finish your run or walk and plenty of vendors to visit.
  4. DoveLewis holds an annual Westie Walk in August. Don’t have a cute Westie? Don’t worry! No matter their pedigree, all friends of Westies are welcome.
  5. The annual Corgi Walk in The Pearl is held in August. Every dollar raised goes to helping abandoned and abused Corgis find happy furever homes through the CRPWCC Corgi Rescue as well as to other pets through the Oregon Humane Society.
  6. Come out for a good time in late summer with the Family Dogs New Life Shelter’s annual Fun Walk and 5k Run. There’s a lot of fun vendors to meet there as well as great prizes in the raffle.
  7. Rose Haven isn’t an animal rescue, although they are pet friendly since they understand that the pets of the women and children they help are part of their families too. Instead, Rose Haven focuses on helping women and children going through abuse or other disruptive life challenges by providing them with a safe community and services to help them. Every Mother’s day weekend they hold their annual Reigning Roses Mother’s Day Walk which is fun and also dog friendly! The 2018 Reigning Roses Mother’s Day Walk will be held on May 13th.

We hope you have fun throughout the year helping these great organizations and getting in some wonderful sunshine and fresh air with Buster. Know any other annual walks or runs in the Portland area that are dog friendly? Let us know! And to find more great organizations helping pets in the Portland area, check out our Community Partners page.

There’s something inherently beautiful about stepping on untouched snow, snow that no one else has walked on. However, before your dog steps out on the snow and makes little paw prints in the white fluff, be sure that he is protected by the dangers that may lurk within.

One of these dangers during the winter months is rock salt that people use to avoid slipping and falling on ice. These salts are extremely hazardous to dogs and can cause burning, irritation, and seizures. Before you and Fido walk out the wintery wonderland, check out these tips to avoid rock salts and keep your dog safe in the snow.

Protect Fido’s Paws

There are a couple of things you can do to protect your dog’s paws from rock salts. The easiest and most effective way is to buy him some booties. These are slip-on shoes that are great for keeping his paws warm and to prevent him from the dangers of salt, ice, and snow. He will probably have to get used to the booties though, so let him walk around inside for a while to break them in. If your dog doesn’t react well to the booties, you can also coat his paws with a thin layer of balm or petroleum jelly. You can even find moisturizers in pet stores that are designed specifically for dogs.

Clip Your Dog’s Nails

Although it is always important to clip your dog’s nails, it is especially critical during the winter months. If your dog’s nails grow too long, they force the toes to separate and allow for the salt and other chemicals to become lodged in their paw. This can damage the paw and cause further discomfort and irritation.

Wash Off as Soon as You Come Inside

If your dog comes inside with salt on his paws, his natural instinct will be to lick it off. This will cause serious stomach problems, so you should help reduce the urge to lick by washing his paws as soon as you walk inside. You can use warm water and a soft towel, or special doggie footbaths that you can purchase from your local pet store.

While on your adventure in the winter wonderland, you may even want to keep a towel with you so that you can constantly wipe off Fido’s paws as soon as it’s necessary.

Use Alternatives to Rock Salts

The salt and chlorine in many deicers can irritate your dog’s paw and even burn him. If ingested, salt can cause vomiting, injury to the kidneys, tremors, seizures, comas, and even death.If you absolutely need to cover your sidewalks or driveway with salt, opt for ice-melting products that are safe for your four-legged friend. There are non-toxic brands of de-icing products such as Safe Paws Ice Melter or Morton Safe-T-Pet, that do not contain salt or chloride. Be sure to read the label when you buy a product and ensure that it is safe for your best friend.

Dogs love to play in the snow just as much as we do. However, we need to be a friend to our four-legged pals and make sure we take the necessary steps to avoid the dangers of rock salts.

Living in the Portland metro area, dogs that love playing outside are usually limited to backyards or fenced-in parks. While the off-leash parks in Portland and the suburbs are usually pretty great, Portland has one huge secret paradise for dogs that is absolutely incredible; the Sandy River Delta Park.

Sandy River Delta Park is open year-round and is the doggie equivalent to Disney World. It’s a massive, thousand-acre park where dogs are allowed to roam free (except for the parking lot and the Confluence Trail), and us humans can get in a lovely, easy, walk. People also bring their horses here, so if you’ve ever wanted to let Buster see a horse in real life there’s a pretty good chance of that here!

The park encompasses a large forest section, grassland area and, of course, the Sandy River section. It is seldom busy (even on summer weekends) and there is always plenty of parking available. If you’re considering taking your dog to a beach, Sandy River is a wonderful alternative to ocean beach. It’s safer, has shaded areas, and tends to have fewer small children present. The water is also shallow and lazy, making it fairly easy to grab toys that drop in on accident.

Later in the summer there are ample blackberries to pick–who loves pie?!  Aside from foxtail seeds and the extremely rare sea lion, this is a very safe place to go spend a warm summer day.

Note of Caution: Dogs must be on-leash on the Confluence Trail–there’s a $100 fine if you are caught without your dog on a leash. If you’re looking for an off-leash friendly option, try the The Meadow Trail.

Recommendations for when you go:

  • Bring something to carry your full doggie bags with you, trashcans are few and far between and often overflowing.
  • Bring a towel to wipe off sand or mud (for the car)–double use as a place to sit on the riverbank.
  • Bug repellant is especially helpful in late Summer/Fall.
  • In warmer months remember to wear sunscreen and put a little sunscreen on your dog’s nose too!
  • When grasses are going to seed bring something to cover your dog’s nose and ears so that they don’t breathe in the harmful seeds called foxtails. These can get lodged in a dog’s lungs, nose, or ears and later require vet attention. The OutFox Field Guard is the best solution I’ve seen so far, but any other product or DIY suggestions are welcome!

If you do head out to the Sandy River Delta Park, send some pictures. If you have other favorite parks in the area, we’d love to hear about them too!

Have fun!